Mastering Fitness

Personal Trainer, Fitness Educator, and Web Developer

Become a fitness master

Programs, books, and more to come

Tag: breathing (Page 1 of 2)

10 Outstanding Quad Stretches (And Why I Hate Them)

tl;dr

I offer my 10 best quad stretches. We discuss why your quads or hips might feel tight and why your hip or knee might hurt. We talk about when stretching isn’t the best solution for pain. I offer alternatives to stretching that might better solve your problems. We talk about the negative and positive side effects of stretching. We even talk about seemingly unrelated causes of quad tightness. I leave you with a short appendix on the pertinent anatomy (because what else would you expect from someone with a masters degree in anatomy?).

Continue reading

Leaning During a Lunge

So you’ve caught yourself or someone else doing this little lean thing while lunging.

Whatever is going on, you know that it ain’t right. That’s a great start! But… what IS going on?

Addressing the Thorax

There are a few things that might be going on here. I’ll describe them based on how they look.

  • Lateral translation of the thorax, looks more like a listing pole
  • Side crunching of the thorax, looks more like one shoulder is lower than the other
Continue reading

Detailed Group Training — How do you teach breathing to 30 people at once?

Personal training can get pretty personal.

When you’re one-on-one with someone, you have more time than you know what to do with. You can test-retest, make up stuff on the fly, and think up new cues that you can use with later clients.

When you have 30 people in a big group, you aren’t doing any of that. sure, you can make up some new cues or whatever, but can’t really see it through like you can when your one-on-one. Do you know if it worked? Too late. It’s time to coach the next person.

Large group training has its difficulties, but it’s also a really efficient way to train certain types of people. If you have people who are out of shape and not in pain, get them in shape in a group. You build camaraderie, forming team through shared suffering. and even if they’re already fit, a group workout is a great way to keep pushing everyone together. Community is one of the best ways to build fitness inertia.

But, if you’ve coached for any length of time, you know that not everyone fits into these simple buckets. I can count on one hand the number of clients I have who don’t have some sort of chronic pain issue that they’re dealing with. I don’t usually recommend that they join these groups, even though and they’re free to take over here at Google and they have some very competent coaches.

Continue reading

The Unseen Importance of a Warm Up — And How to Write Your Own

On my way to the gym. Running late. Got out of the office late. Then forgot something and had to head back really quickly. Stopped at seemingly every traffic light that has ever existed.

Surely you’ve experienced that. Do you ever skip your warm up when that happens?

How much of it do you skip? Do you even have a warm up?

There are some parts of a warm up that are absolutely essential. Then there are some things that you can use to “stack the deck”, so to speak, to ensure you’re optimizing your session.

A good warm up sets you up for a great workout.

Continue reading

Safely Reaching the Arms Overhead

Are you one of those people who likes to do overhead barbell pressing… but has no business pressing a barbell overhead?

How do you get your arms overhead? How do your clients get their arms overhead? Do you have the range of motion to do it safely? Or are you just overloading your back and irritating your shoulders?

I don’t want to sit here and pretend to tell you that I have the magic answer. It doesn’t work like that.

What I CAN offer you, however, is some insight on some of the things that have seemed to work for me… even the things that are a little counterintuitive.

Today we’ll discuss some things that have helped my clients safely perform overhead work.

Continue reading
« Older posts

© 2022 Lance Goyke

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑